Your Fall 2020 semester at a glance

Before now there have never been so many questions about a fall semester.

It’s not that college hasn’t always been a big deal loaded with important decisions including choice of school, teachers, location, housing, and financial aid. But today the questions are more complex than ever, with answers that can sometimes be vague because they are dependent upon a changing environment that is unpredictable and not in our control.

At the College of Performing Arts, we have been working hard to adapt our programs to the puzzles created by COVID-19. While we expect that the majority of the fall semester will occur remotely, we are also preparing to gradually incorporate in-person instruction and performance as allowed by the government and where safe. What is more, as we return to campus, it is likely that social distancing measures will reduce the amount of space available and that the need for the wearing of masks and other precautions will necessitate some percentage of remote instruction even when we are allowed to return to campus. In light of all of these variables, we have rethought our fundamental structure across all three schools of the College of Performing Arts in order to allow for the greatest flexibility.

While much about the fall will be different than ever before, some things will remain the same: our unique core philosophy will be evident in what we offer this fall and throughout the rest of the next year. Our college and schools are devoted to developing creative artists with the highest skills in their craft, who are entrepreneurial, technologically savvy, highly collaborative, capable of and interested in working across styles and genres, all while being socially and community conscious. What is more, we are placing extra emphasis this coming year on supporting the healthy physical, emotional, and spiritual practice of all of our students and faculty.

We believe that The College of Performing Arts did remarkably well last semester moving all of our programs online in just a few short weeks. From Richard III and Appalachian Spring, to guest lectures by Sonny Rollins, Bill Irwin, Frederica Von Stade, and others, to a whole array of professional-level recordings produced by ensembles across Jazz and Mannes: a lot of inspiring work was created. What we are now doing is taking the very best of the work that emerged in the spring semester and using it as the foundation for the work to come. We know that the fall will be significant, transformative, and meaningful for each and every student at the college.

What you will explore on this site will give you more detailed information regarding each course of study and what your experience will look like this coming fall semester. Click here to read more about the coming semester at the College of Performing Arts. We hope that this will inspire and excite you for all that is planned for the fall.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

Richard Kessler

Executive Dean, College of Performing Arts
Dean, Mannes School of Music

Keller Coker

Dean, School of Jazz

Pippin Parker

Dean, School of Drama

For more than one hundred years, Mannes has embraced its role of preparing students to become highly skilled musician citizens who use their artistry in ways that are socially engaged, relevant, and entrepreneurial. The need for musicians who are focused, flexible, curious, and adaptable will be greater now than ever before. 

While we do not yet know what the performing arts will look like in just a few years from now, there is no doubt that we are in the midst of a seismic shift both within our field and within the larger social and cultural landscapes. It is those artists who today are experimenting with new ways of presenting work, engaging in discourse, are doubling down on the opportunity to learn new repertoire and refine their technique, who will be the most prepared to lead the way in the post-COVID world. 

It is with this in mind that we have designed an approach to the fall semester that will ensure that each student can continue their journey of artistic growth and development at Mannes this coming fall.

It is our goal at Mannes to provide you with an education and an experience this semester that will place you at the forefront of conversations and movements that will redefine the performing arts and all creative enterprise.

Explore performance-based projects

Staying true to the creative spirit of Mannes, a wide range of performance-based projects are currently being developed by faculty for the fall semester. Whether you are a voice student, a composer, a theorist or an instrumentalist, you will have the opportunity to explore new repertoire, create and perform new works, or make something entirely new this coming semester. All of this project-based work will happen in a highly collaborative ensemble-based setting where you’ll work closely with faculty to learn, rehearse, create, and perform. 

In addition to these performance and making-based projects, we have developed a modified approach to the world-renowned Techniques of Music curriculum at Mannes this fall to ensure that what we offer in music theory and ear training remains the very best among all peer institutions. This modified approach is grounded in work that we have done to identify synergies and ways to fuse together music theory course work with ear-training and dictation coursework to create a combined three-credit course that will hone these essential skills in a holistic way through a curriculum that is tailor-made for remote classes. For graduate students, PDPL students, and others who have completed their core work in techniques of music, similar courses, and opportunities to advance your core skills and musicianship will be available. 

Ensuring that we remain committed to the notion that musicians must be well-rounded and have opportunities to develop related skills and areas of knowledge, all students will continue to have opportunities to choose to undertake work in arts entrepreneurship, university electives, music history, and more. 

As you continue at Mannes this fall, you will remain deeply connected to your major teacher. Through fourteen lessons across the semester, this staple of your work and your training will remain at the heart of all that you do here at Mannes.

New options and pathways for continuing graduate and PDPL students

For continuing graduate and PDPL students who are looking for something different this fall semester, Mannes has designed two pathways that will give you an entrypoint into new and different kinds of work, making, and study. These options will expand your knowledge and skills in different ways while keeping you on track to graduate. 

The first of these options is the arts management and entrepreneurship pathway. For that student who has a particular interest in developing their own artistic agency and career agency or for that student who has the seed of an idea about a new enterprise or a new way of doing things, this pathway is ideally suited. Imagine that opera company or chamber orchestra; string quartet or teaching artist organization that you are envisioning and that you believe can bring new solutions to long-standing problems in classical music. This semester will provide those who are interested with the skills and the opportunity to make these ideas a reality. Courses that will be available to graduate and PDPL students in this pathway include Marketing for the Arts, and The Cultural and Creative Industries

The second option is the creative placemaking pathway. If you are looking to develop your ability and your role as a socially conscious leader with the knowledge and strategies to aid in the facilitation of community-led change, you belong in the new and growing field of Creative Placemaking. Today, when health issues are intersecting with social justice issues and the boundary between what is local and what is global is more blurred than ever before, skilled artists who wish to take their creative work and harness it to shape their neighborhoods, towns, cities, and communities are needed more than ever. This pathway, made available through the partnership and support of Art Place America draws from a series of courses that are offered within the new Creative Community Development graduate minor at The New School. 

Students who opt for one of these two alternative pathways will also continue to study with their major teacher, receiving fourteen lessons throughout the semester.

CoPA Core: A new approach for first year undergraduate students at Mannes, Jazz, and Drama

For more than a year, a group of over twenty faculty members across CoPA have been working to develop a first year curriculum for undergraduate students at Jazz, Mannes, and Drama. This new first year curriculum is truly ground-breaking and focuses deeply on the skills and knowledge that any 21st century artist would need for a successful career and life in the arts. Launching with excitement this fall, this new curriculum, the CoPA Core, comprises a set of interdisciplinary first-year courses that provide foundational experiences for new students. Each of the four courses within the set focuses in on one or two related themes: 

  • Improvisation and collaboration
  • Technology and experimentation
  • Socially engaged artistry
  • Well-being as a whole human artist

These core courses will connect new students from across the College of Performing Arts, engaging all of us in creative interdisciplinary work.

A Holistic Approach to Remote Learning and Performing

Building on what was accomplished last semester, the faculty at Mannes will be developing and teaching their courses in ways that combine live class time with asynchronous work and self-guided learning. This combination is specifically designed to limit the number of hours you might spend in front of your screen and to maximize the flexibility and adaptability of each course. 

Just like any other year, students at Mannes will be involved in a wide array of projects that will be supported by a production team and a staff that will bring to life a range of works and activities including high-profile performances, process-oriented and exploratory projects, and everything between.

Redefining Classical Music

The work that is now taking place to plan the coming semester was predicated on the same questions that we ask each year: what do you, the Mannes student, need to know, understand, and be able to do, in order to be a successful artist upon graduation? What do you need to know, understand, and be able to do, in order to live the life of an artist, to take the stage with a major orchestra or opera company, to apply your music to social change, to use it to create new dialogues and new kinds of work? Regardless of the way that classes take place this coming semester, these core questions continue to drive our work at Mannes to ensure that each student receives the highest quality possible training and education this coming semester and far, far beyond.

There is no doubt that we are living through a time that will forever change how we see ourselves and our role in the world as artists. It is our goal at Mannes to provide you with an education and an experience this semester that will place you at the forefront of conversations and movements that will redefine the performing arts and all creative enterprise. It will be those who are developing their voices and technique and perspectives on the world at this very moment will be the change-makers of the arts.

We look forward to spending the semester ahead with you.

Your
Contacts

Richard Kessler

Dean

Bill Gustafson

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Caroline Sonett-Assor

Undergraduate Advisor

Olivia Framke

Advisor MM, PDPL

The School of Drama has roots dating back to 1940, when the legendary Dramatic Workshop led by founder Erwin Piscater and his faculty, including Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, fostered some of the most important artistic voices in the modern American theater.

Today’s theater landscape is rapidly evolving to reflect the current world, and we’ve redesigned the Fall 2020 semester so that School of Drama students are fully prepared to be the socially-conscious artistic voices that define the present and create the future of the profession. All students will receive a rigorous, relevant, and cutting-edge education by working with our outstanding faculty, our world-renowned artistic partners, and guest artists. Students will hone their technique, expand their creative vision, and strengthen their skills as they develop new plays, bring fresh perspectives to old works, make films, create projection designs, and more.

Unlike what has been offered previously at Drama, remote teaching and learning has uniquely positioned students to benefit from more intimate sessions and we’ve carefully identified the aspects of training that will be best served online in these private and small group lessons.

Today’s theater landscape is rapidly evolving to reflect the current world, and we’ve redesigned the Fall 2020 semester so that School of Drama students are fully prepared to be the socially-conscious artistic voices that define the present and create the future of the profession.

BFA Fall 2020 Curriculum

This Fall, the College of Performing Arts will launch the CoPA Core course series for all Freshman students across Mannes School of Music, the School of Jazz and Contemporary Music, and the School of Drama. CoPA Core courses will provide multidisciplinary, foundational experiences for students in the areas of improvisation and collaboration, technology and experimentation, socially engaged artistry, and well-being as a whole human artist. 

Our continuing undergraduate students will have a variety of options to choose from in private/small group lessons, skill-building, project-based making, and elective courses at the foundational, intermediate, and/or advanced levels based on the existing prerequisite structure. All BFA students will be eligible to study on a Part-Time or Full-Time basis for the semester. 

Building upon the successful performance adaptations that occurred remotely in the Spring 2020 semester, we will be adapting Euripides’ The Bacchae, directed as an online experience by Professor Dennis Hilton-Reid.  Any student who auditioned and was cast into the BFA Mainstage productions has a place in The Bacchae. While we will be pausing the Creative Cafe this semester due to our online circumstances, we are very excited to offer the new BFA Repertory Company, which will produce three to four student-proposed projects over the course of the semester with the resources and support of the staff and production teams at the School of Drama and the guidance of BFA Faculty.

MFA Fall 2020 Curriculum

All of our graduate students will embark on a 15-credit semester which will include a variety of coursework in private and/or small group lessons, major skills, project-based making and electives. Keeping the spirit of collaboration that is essential to the making experience in the MFA program, all students within a cohort will participate in the newly designed collaborative making course, Cinema Project Workshop.

Second-year graduate acting students will take private lessons in Alexander Technique, Voice, or a combination of both, Scene Study (with camera), Shakespeare Studio, and elective courses. Second-year directing students will take private or small group lessons in Second Year Directing, Directing for Screen, Shakespeare Studio, and elective courses. Second-year playwriting students will take private or small group lessons in Second Year Playwriting, How Plays Work, Writing for Television, and elective courses.

Third-year graduate acting students will take private lessons in Alexander Technique, Voice, or a combination of both, Process in Practice, Business of the Business, and elective courses. Third year directing students will take private or small group lessons in Third Year Directing, Directing for Screen, Professional Practice Seminar, and elective courses. Third-year playwriting students will take private or small group lessons in Third Year Playwriting, Writing for Film, Thesis Supervision, and elective courses. 

Staying true to our core values

At the School of Drama, we are unwavering in our commitment to the fundamental pillars that ground our artistic approach including training, making, and meaning. These core values will prepare our students to be the generation of multi-passionate and hyphenated artists who see possibilities in constraints and will carve out a bold and innovative vision for the way ahead.

Your
Contacts

Pippin Parker

Dean

Stephen Brown-Fried

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Kesli Lavia

Advisor

At its inception over three decades ago, the School of Jazz and Contemporary Music at The New School broke new ground as the first jazz-specific conservatory in the world. Today, we are a school that embraces both tradition and innovation by expanding the boundaries, genres, and disciplines that define our music while always remaining true to the kind of rigorous training that has elevated all of our alumni throughout their careers. 

Today, the music industry is grappling with the generation-defining ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, our field and our world are now reckoning with systemic and deeply entrenched racism, demanding change in an ever louder and more unified voice. While no one can foresee how the future of performing arts will change, it is certain that it must change. Artists who dig in at this moment, who see it as an opportunity to be involved in the discourse around those changes, to experiment with new technology and cross disciplines to create new work, will be uniquely ready to adapt and contribute their voice to a post-COVID industry.

Our students are nurtured as innovators and entrepreneurs, prepared to meet the challenges of this rapidly evolving creative and cultural landscape.

The Fall 2020 Curriculum

In light of the development that most courses at The New School will be taught remotely in the coming semester, we have adapted the Jazz & Contemporary Music curriculum to ensure that we continue to offer a rigorous and rewarding journey of artistic growth and exploration for all students. Our “artist as mentor” approach to teaching and learning will remain at the core of our curriculum. To ensure that this element of our work remains central, the number of private lessons that students receive over the course of each semester has been increased from ten to twelve. 

Students at The School of Jazz & Contemporary Music will find themselves immediately immersed in the work that fuels their creativity. You will be enrolled in foundational courses that address skill-building in the two most important areas for any musician today, performing/improvising and composing. You will be cast in three five-week modules where they will work with their peers and the greatest faculty in the world to create new recorded performances. From there, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of projects and ensembles that will meet remotely and may also have the ability to rehearse and record live in Arnhold Hall. 

Student agency and choice is another hallmark of a New School Jazz and Contemporary Music education. This too will remain central in the semester to come. Each student will be able to continue to develop their artistry in the broadest possible ways by expanding your knowledge and skill in a wide array of related fields including arts entrepreneurship, design, literature, history, journalism, and more through courses offered across CoPA as well as at Parsons and Lang. What is more, for those students who seek an alternative to full-time study, part-time options are being developed so that each and every student can continue their work and continue their artistic growth here at The New School.

With so much of the semester unfolding remotely, our goal is to bring together our community online in as many ways as possible. This is why we will continue to host guest lectures with renowned artists, open mic nights, and faculty performances each and every week.

CoPA Core: A new approach for first year undergraduate students at Jazz, Mannes, and Drama

For more than a year, a group of over twenty faculty members across CoPA have been working to develop a first year curriculum for undergraduate students at Jazz, Mannes, and Drama. This new first year curriculum is truly ground-breaking and focuses deeply on the skills and knowledge that any 21st century artist would need for a successful career and life in the arts. Launching with excitement this fall, this new curriculum, the CoPA Core, comprises a set of interdisciplinary first-year courses that provide foundational experiences for new students. Each of the four courses within the set focuses in on one or two related themes: 

  • Improvisation and collaboration
  • Technology and experimentation
  • Socially engaged artistry
  • Well-being as a whole human artist. 

These core courses will connect new students from across the College of Performing Arts, engaging all of us in creative interdisciplinary work.

Staying true to our core philosophy

The School of Jazz & Contemporary Music challenges young musicians to master their craft, while encouraging them to explore, experiment and develop their own voice. Our students are nurtured as innovators and entrepreneurs, prepared to meet the challenges of this rapidly evolving creative and cultural landscape. While at The New School, our students perform – but not only that: they compose, collaborate, improvise and learn to lead, in an environment fostering visionary leadership through art, imagination, creativity and responsibility.

At the School of Jazz and Contemporary Music at The New School, we are dedicated to being the strongest voice for the future of music. Our program offers students rigorous technical training along with the freedom to create their own place within that ever-evolving future.

Your
Contacts

Keller Coker

Dean

Mike Forfia

Advisor, BFA

Dashawn Ealey

Advisor, BA/BFA

The New School’s College of Performing Arts launched the Master’s in Arts Management and Entrepreneurship (MA AME) in 2017 as a to offer integrated instruction in both arts management and artistic practice. It is, therefore, one of the first graduate programs in arts management that is tailor-made for active performing artists; designed to help you to develop the critical skills needed to become artistic leaders – both onstage and beyond.

Today, we are in the midst of a health pandemic and also seismic shifts in our society and culture. The call to address systemic racism grows louder each day. The call for economic and climate justice are also on the rise. At CoPA, we believe strongly in the role of the artist in ushering forth positive change. We also know that it will be those artists who utilize this remarkable disruption of the status-quo as an opportunity to be involved in experimenting with new ways of presenting work, engaging in discourse regarding the future of our institutions and the role of artists in creating a more just world, who double down on the opportunity to learn new repertoire and refine their technique, who will be the most prepared to lead the way in the post-COVID world.

It is with this in mind that we have designed an approach to the fall semester that will ensure that each student can continue their journey of artistic growth and development in the MA – Arts Management and Entrepreneurship program this coming fall.

We are committed to ensuring that we continue to offer a rigorous and rewarding journey as you develop the skills you need to thrive as an artist and entrepreneur, both personally and professionally.

The Fall 2020 Curriculum

In close collaboration with MA AME and COPA faculty members, we have modified the Arts Management & Entrepreneurship curriculum that highlights career-driven projects, arts industry insights, social impact, and real-world relevance for a remote learning environment. We are committed to ensuring that we continue to offer a rigorous and rewarding journey as you develop the skills you need to thrive as an artist and entrepreneur, both personally and professionally. You’ll continue to deepen your abilities as an artist while gaining knowledge and vital skills that prepare you for a diverse range of career options for a rapidly changing performing arts world. At the same time, if it becomes safe to take advantage of space and to move projects on-site, we will be prepared to do so in the way that we have reshaped the fall 2020 semester experience.

Ensuring that we remain committed to the notion that artists must be well-rounded and have opportunities to develop related skills and areas of knowledge, all students will continue to have opportunities to choose to undertake coursework across the university including in the newly launched Graduate Minor in Creative Community Development.

True to the creative and collaborative spirit of the College of Performing Arts, a wide range of performance-based projects are currently being developed by faculty. We are working to make sure that there continue to be opportunities for MA AME students to interact and create with fellow CoPA students. All of this project-based work will happen in a highly collaborative ensemble-based setting where you’ll work closely with faculty to learn, rehearse, create, and perform. 

The spring 2020 semester revealed the advantages and disadvantages of remote teaching and learning. We have carefully reflected on the successes and disappointments of the past semester. Informed by student and faculty feedback, CoPA has taken extensive measures to ensure that the fall semester will be of the highest possible quality. To that end, we have adapted the following MA AME courses for remote instruction:

CENT 5100 – Marketing for the Arts
CENT 5200 – Artists and Community Change + CENT 5250 Creative Skills for Community Development
CENT 5210 – The Cultural and Creative Industries
CENT 5305 – Arts Management and Entrepreneurship Capstone Prep
CENT 5400 – Political and Public Advocacy for the Arts
CENT 5700 – Creative Producing and Performance Production Management
NMGM 5004 – Fundraising and Development
CENT 5850 – APR Workshop: Creative Skills for Civic Practice with Michael Rohd

Additionally, the artistic practice requirement, intended to be an avenue for you to maintain, deepen, or expand your artistic skills, can still be fulfilled by receiving credit for an outside project (gig, etc.) by completing an ELA, taking an approved CoPA course, or by taking the Fall 2020 APR Workshop: Creative Skills for Civic Practice. The MA AME program will continue to aid in securing an internship to fulfill the internship requirement, intended to provide an opportunity to develop your enterprise, management, or administrative skills and experience.

The Arts Management and Entrepreneurship faculty are today’s pioneering artist-entrepreneurs and arts leaders. Each member of the faculty who will be teaching courses and leading projects this year will be receiving high levels of support and training over the summer to ensure that they are fully ready and equipped to teach remotely. 

The MA AME courses have been reevaluated and redesigned to integrate synchronous “live” class time with meaningful asynchronous work and self-guided learning. This combination is specifically designed to limit the amount of hours you might spend in front of your screen and to maximize the flexibility and adaptability of each course. 

Just like any other year, students will continue to develop and expand their capstone projects with the guidance of the program director, select faculty, and outside partners.

Staying true to our core values

There is no doubt that we are living through a time that will forever alter almost every facet of life. The arts and culture sector has been acutely impacted by the current crises. We believe that it will be the artist-entrepreneurs who make use of the disruptions to the status quo. They will be the ones who re envision the structures of non-profit organizations and cultural and performing arts institutions. They will reimagine governance structures and bring fresh creativity to what it means to be a leader. Artists will be at the forefront of activist and social justice movements.

The core values of the Master’s in Arts Management and Entrepreneurship remain untouched. The program enables students to deepen their abilities as performers while gaining knowledge and skills that prepare them for a diverse range of career options in performing arts management, arts administration, entrepreneurship, arts education, cultural policy and advocacy, and arts philanthropy. Students continue to develop the skills artists need to thrive as an artist, adding to their talents as a musician, composer, actor, director, playwright, or multidisciplinary artist.

Your
Contacts

Maggie Koozer

Vice Dean, Curriculum & Learning

Alex Chadwell

Academic Affairs Coordinator

Olivia Framke

Advisor

Coming Soon!

For more than one hundred years, Mannes has embraced its role of preparing students to become highly skilled musician citizens who use their artistry in ways that are socially engaged, relevant, and entrepreneurial. The need for musicians who are focused, flexible, curious, and adaptable will be greater now than ever before.

While we do not yet know what the performing arts will look like in just a few years from now, there is no doubt that we are in the midst of a seismic shift both within our field and within the larger social and cultural landscapes. It is those artists who today are experimenting with new ways of presenting work, engaging in discourse, are doubling down on the opportunity to learn new repertoire and refine their technique, who will be the most prepared to lead the way in the post-COVID world.

It is with this in mind that we have designed an approach to the fall semester that will ensure that each student can continue their journey of artist growth and development at Mannes this coming fall.

we have designed an approach to the fall semester that will ensure that each student can continue their journey of artist growth and development at Mannes this coming fall.

Subheader

Staying true to the creative spirit of Mannes, a wide range of performance-based projects are currently being developed by faculty for the fall semester. Whether you are a voice student, a composer, a theorist or an instrumentalist, you will have the opportunity to explore new repertoire, create and perform new works, or make something entirely new this coming semester. All of this project-based work will happen in a highly collaborative ensemble-based setting where you’ll work closely with faculty to learn, rehearse, create, and perform.

In addition to these performance and making-based projects, we have developed a modified approach to the world-renowned Techniques of Music curriculum at Mannes this fall to ensure that what we offer in music theory and ear training remains the very best among all peer institutions. This modified approach is grounded in work that we have done to identify synergies and ways to fuse together music theory course work with ear-training and dictation coursework to create a combined three-credit course that will hone these essential skills in a holistic way through a curriculum that is tailor-made for remote classes. For graduate students, PDPL students, and others who have completed their core work in techniques of music, similar courses and opportunities to advance your core skills and musicianship will be available.

Ensuring that we remain committed to the notion that musicians must be well-rounded and have opportunities to develop related skills and areas of knowledge, all students will continue to have opportunities to choose to undertake work in arts entrepreneurship, university electives, music history, and more.

As you continue at Mannes this fall, you will remain deeply connected to your major teacher. Through fourteen lessons across the semester, this staple of your work and your training will remain at the heart of all that you do here at Mannes.

Subheader

For continuing graduate and PDPL students who are looking for something different this fall semester, Mannes has designed two alternative pathways; two new options that will expand your knowledge and skills in different ways while keeping you on track to graduate.

The first of these pathways is the arts management and entrepreneurship pathway. For that student who has a particular interest in developing their own artistic agency and career agency or for that student who have the seed of an idea about a new enterprise or a new way of doing things, this pathway is ideally suited. Imagine that opera company or chamber orchestra; string quartet or teaching artist organization that you are envisioning and that you believe can bring new solutions to long-standing problems in classical music. This semester will provide those who are interested with the skills and the opportunity to make these ideas a reality. Courses that will be available to graduate and PDPL students in this pathway include Marketing for the Arts, Finance for Arts Managers, and The Cultural and Creative Industries.

The second alternative pathway is the Creative Placemaking pathway. If you are looking to develop your ability and your role as a socially conscious leader with the knowledge and strategies to aid in the facilitation ofimplement community-led change, you belong in the new and growing field of Creative Placemaking. Today, when health issues are intersecting with social justice issues and the boundary between what is local and what is global is more blurred than ever before, skilled artists who wish to take their creative work and harness it to shape their neighborhoods, towns, cities, and communities are needed more than ever.This pathway, made available through the partnership and support of Art Place America draws from a series of courses that are offered within the new Creative Community Development[NAME] graduate minor at The New School.

Students who opt for one of these two alternative pathways will also continue to study with your major teacher, receiving fourteen lessons throughout the semester.

Subheader

Building on what was accomplished last semester, the faculty at Mannes will be developing and teaching their courses in ways that combine live class time with asynchronous work and self-guided learning. This combination is specifically designed to limit the amount of hours you might spend in front of your screen and to maximize the flexibility and adaptability of each course.

Just like any other year, students at Mannes will be involved in a wide array of projects that will be supported by a production team and a staff that will bring to life a range of works and activities including high-profile performances, process-oriented and exploratory projects, and everything between.

Subheader

The work that is now taking place to plan the coming semester was predicated on the same questions that we ask each year: what do you, the Mannes student, need to know, understand, and be able to do, in order to be a successful artist upon graduation? What do you need to know, understand, and be able to do, in order to live the life of an artist, to take the stage with a major orchestra or opera company, to apply your music to social change, to use it to create new dialogues and new kinds of work? Regardless of the way that classes take place this coming semester, these core questions continue to drive our work at Mannes to ensure that each student receives the highest quality possible training and education this coming semester and far, far beyond.

There is no doubt that we are living through a time that will forever change how we see ourselves and our role in the world as artists. It is our goal at Mannes to provide you with an education and an experience this semester that will place you at the forefront of conversations and movements that will redefine the performing arts and all creative enterprise. It will be those who are developing their voices and technique and perspectives on the world at this very moment will be the change-makers of the arts.

We look forward to spending the semester ahead with you.

Your
Contacts

Maggie Koozer

Vice Dean, Curriculum & Learning

Kalun Leung

Assistant Director, Academic Affairs

Caroline Sonett-Assor

Advisor

Make, Create, Perform: Special Projects

Improv Artists Lab

Your body, your voice, your music, your humor, and your fear. This is the DNA of an improvisational encounter and the departure point for the work of the Improvisational Artists Lab. This collaborative course between Jazz, Drama & Mannes explores the outer reaches of how student performers from different disciplines interplay using the common language of improvisation. It draws inspiration from personal narratives through weekly explorations of text, composition, soundscape, and movement. In this video, you can see a few moments from our exciting digital experience this spring where students transformed themselves from artists in a classroom to those of virtual creators in a very short period of time, demonstrating incredible growth, exceptional self-awareness, and tremendous virtuosity. 

We very much look forward to working with students in the fall and observing their collective creative ethos, chemistry, and use of digital tools to create compelling, boundary-pushing, and relevant projects that are not only reflective of the present but also prepare students for post-COVID performance challenges. 

Jane Ira Bloom – Saxophonist/composer, School of Jazz and Contemporary Music faculty

Joe Grifasi – Actor/director, School of Drama faculty

Cinema Projects

Each year, students from the School of Drama at the College of Performing Arts produce a series of short films in collaboration with populations across the university. This past semester provided our students with the extraordinary challenge of adapting their screenplays to the very real online scenarios everyone across America has been experiencing. Our students expertly adjusted their projects without compromising any of the stories from their original screenplays and found opportunities to exploit the complication of online communication. The process was incredibly rewarding, resulting in four engaging and successful short films featuring creative contributions from students at the School of Drama, Mannes School of Music, School of Jazz & Contemporary Music, Media Studies, Parsons, and Lang.

This fall we look forward to new collaborations, new explorations, and new stories emerging from the creative minds of our CoPA students. We can’t wait to see what they create.

William Cusick, College of Performing Arts faculty

Piano Studies

I am very excited for the students coming in this year, it’s truly a sea change in the landscape and those who come in with an open heart and engage in the process will truly do very well” – J.Y. Song

Pavlina Dokovska, chair of the piano department at Mannes, and J.Y. Song, piano faculty at Mannes their approach to online teaching, special fall projects, and the importance of music right now.

Improv Ensembles

Keller Coker, Dean of the School of Jazz and Contemporary Music in conversation with faculty members Matt Wilson, Angelica Sanchez, and Sylvie Courvoisier about transitioning their Improv Ensembles to the digital space, the wonderful work that students recorded remotely and the opportunities ahead using technology for extraordinary ensemble recordings.

Take a listen!

Matt Wilson’s Improv EnsembleIdeas in Numbers

Sylvie Courvoisier’s Improv EnsembleReincarnation

Angelica Sanchez’ Film Improv EnsembleUntitled

Creative Technologies

As a performer, engineer, inventor, and educator in the digital sound space, I see technology as a critical and promising medium by which to further our work in these times.” – Levy I. Lorenzo

Levy I. Lorenzo works at the intersection of music, art, and technology. On an international scale, his body of work spans custom electronics design, sound engineering, instrument building, installation art, free improvisation, and classical percussion. He is the Assistant Professor of Creative Technologies at the College of Performing Arts

THEATER NOW

Stephen Brown-Fried, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Dennis Hilton, faculty at the School of Drama discuss remote learning opportunities, challenging topics, and breaking through the platform.

MANNES OPERA

I am genuinely excited for the opportunity to spend this next year in this community

Emma Griffin, Managing Artistic Director of the Mannes Opera speaks about the year ahead at Mannes Opera.

HOUSE MUSIC

New Works for Household Percussion

In April 2020, as lockdowns began across the US and in-person classes were canceled, composers and Mannes faculty members Missy Mazzoli, Ian Rosenbaum, and David T. Little looked for ways to keep their students connected with performers and with each other. They paired four composers with student percussionists, to create new works for the instruments, objects, dishes and cutlery the percussionists happened to have with them in quarantine.

The resulting works explore the beauty and potential of the everyday objects around us, and remind us that there is potential for creative and joyful music-making in nearly every circumstance.